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The Difference in Light Sources

The Difference in Light Sources

The Aboriginal people who used to live on the same land that we do now were certainly very intuitive and imaginative in numerous ways. They discovered creative ways to do so many different things. Without electricity, they found ways of staying warm, communicating and staying entertained. Another thing that they did was find ways to create light after the sun had gone down. It can be interesting to compare how Aboriginals found light sources, versus how we do it nowadays. Some methods are the same, but others have definitely changed a great deal since back then!

Aboriginals Light Sources

Campfire

One of the many tools and main source of light that Aboriginals used was fire. Fire was an essential part of everyday life. It was used to heat, cook, and light up the darkness. Nobody would have survived the winters in the cold, harsh land without fire. Native American tribes would have a large fire burning in their village at all times. It would be everybody’s responsibility to ensure that the fire never went out, and somebody would always be watching it. People would frequently go out to the forest to cut down firewood to feed the flames. Smaller fires would be set up inside the Aboriginal people’s homes. These smaller fires would be used for cooking meat and boiling water. At night, fire would be the only way to see things, aside from the moonlight.

Modern Day Light Sources

Led Light Lamp

These days, we do not usually depend on fire for light. When we walk into a room, we can flip a switch and turn on the light. This is a great thing, because we are able to carry on our tasks into the night. However, it could also be viewed as being something negative. People are staying awake later and later now, because they have the ability to continue working at night. This is not good for our natural sleep cycles, as they are getting disturbed. We use a lot of LED lights for maximum brightness. We can even put LED bars on our cars so that everything is more visible at night! There are many different lightbar reviews online if you haven’t had a chance to check them out yet. Flashlights have also largely replaced fire as a light source for the nighttime hours. They are portable, and therefore can be brought outdoors, or in the woods if you are going camping.

Conclusion

A lot has changed in terms of light sources over the last couple hundred years. Before, it was incredibly difficult to have a portable light source for a long period of time. Aboriginals could use torches, but only up until the fire burned out. We now have the ability to even attach LED light bars to our cars, and drive through the darkness! We have continued to progress and overcome obstacles that stood in our way in the past. If the trend continues as it has been, we will likely be even farther ahead soon!

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The Importance of Fish in Aboriginal Culture

The Importance of Fish in Aboriginal Culture

In modern day culture, the fish is mainly a sign of food. We all know this, and there’s plenty of uses for it. We’re all used to the idea that there are fishing laws affect how we treat fish. Laws of the sea state how we’re allowed to farm fish, while laws of the river dictate whether we can catch and keep fish, or whether they need to be released back to the wild. Culturally, the way we use fish is completely different from, say, the use that aboriginal people get from fish. We’re going to take a look at the differences in this article.

Fish as Pets

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Aboriginal peoples do not keep fish as pets, as such. There is a heavy connection between the species and the culture of the people, but they don’t keep them as pets in the same way that other races of people do. As a wider community, non-Aboriginal people keep fish in tanks. This is commonplace amongst plenty of countries. The tanks are made up of glass, ‘toys’ and pebbles. And it comes with a lot of maintenance like feeding and cleaning to keep the fish healthy. To do this, we use filters to circulate the water. The higher quality, the better. Cascade is a good choice, for example.

Fishing in the Community

Children Fishing

Some of the close bond between fish and Aboriginal people belongs to the fact that fishing is a simple, healthy and easy choice of food. It’s also an important way to promote the strong economy of Aboriginal people and to encourage trade and support from other areas in their countries. Whereas fishing is done as a means to an end for Aboriginals, for non-Aboriginal people, fishing can be done as a hobby or for business. There’s plenty of uses. Between the two communities, fish levels are managed to continually encourage a healthy level of livestock going forward.

Art Culture

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Fish within an artistic culture is strong within the Aboriginal lives. Whereby there is no strong connection for non-Aboriginal people, other than personal preference, the strong livestock and business connection coupled with fish being a steady part of traditional diets, the link for aboriginal people is much stronger. Traditionally, there has been no language between Aboriginal people, therefore pictures and art were a strong way to communicate messages. Language – physical and vocal – has always been at the forefront of communication for most other cultures.

Folklore

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Traditional folklore is strong for many cultures in the world, not just Aboriginal people, although their legend and myth is very strong. There are countless stories of monster fish and giant fish spread across their great history. Whereas other cultures have been obsessed by the idea of the evolution of fish and the way they live their lives from a scientific and aquatic standpoint.

Fish are a huge part of the life of lots of people. Even more so as the health risks of red meat begins to filter through into a lot of Western lives. Fishing will become a major part of the way we eat, but we must also acknowledge the importance fish have within other, smaller cultures around the world.

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Common Mistakes When Teaching Aboriginal Studies

Common Mistakes When Teaching Aboriginal Studies

The most important thing when teaching – anything – is ethics, teaching from an ethical position in regards to both the subject matter and the students. When instructors plan and execute their lessons from that worldview, the likelihood of problems within the classroom diminishes. However, the inherent challenges involved in teaching Aboriginal Studies can lead to serious pitfalls.

It all begins with what Mary Louise Pratt refers to as contact zones, or spaces where cultures meet and clash. The context for these contact zones often involves power relations between Western cultures and “the other” and are fraught with colonization, slavery, and the aftermaths of those power relations. Within the United States, there are several contact zones, as the history of the United States consists of colonization of Native American Aboriginal lands and the importation of African slaves. Even after so many years, the tension lives on, and every time a students and their instructor encounter a text, cultural representation, or their history, they are entering the contact zone.

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