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American Aboriginal Culture

American Aboriginal Culture

The debate surrounding aboriginal American culture has raged across conversations for decades. At the center of the intercontinental American discussion has been the myth that Italian explorer Christopher Columbus discovered the Americas in 1492. Columbus actually first landed in the Bahamas and later took control of the indigenous populations on the islands of Haiti and the Dominican Republic.

The ancestors of Native American tribes were thriving cultures long before Columbus sailed. As nomads these people lived in Alaska more than 12,000 years ago. Across the continent of North America, there were more than 50 million aboriginals, with 10 million of that number living in the United States.

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Common Mistakes When Teaching Aboriginal Studies

Common Mistakes When Teaching Aboriginal Studies

The most important thing when teaching – anything – is ethics, teaching from an ethical position in regards to both the subject matter and the students. When instructors plan and execute their lessons from that worldview, the likelihood of problems within the classroom diminishes. However, the inherent challenges involved in teaching Aboriginal Studies can lead to serious pitfalls.

It all begins with what Mary Louise Pratt refers to as contact zones, or spaces where cultures meet and clash. The context for these contact zones often involves power relations between Western cultures and “the other” and are fraught with colonization, slavery, and the aftermaths of those power relations. Within the United States, there are several contact zones, as the history of the United States consists of colonization of Native American Aboriginal lands and the importation of African slaves. Even after so many years, the tension lives on, and every time a students and their instructor encounter a text, cultural representation, or their history, they are entering the contact zone.

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Respect for Aboriginal Culture and Elders

Respect for Aboriginal Culture and Elders

As in so many parts of the world, the history of the interaction between aboriginal peoples and European colonists on the North American continent has been a bloody and complicated one. The violence, injustice, racial prejudice, and deception that ultimately characterized much of this cultural interaction continue to reverberate uncomfortably in the United States and Canada today, all bound up with stark facts of massive disease mortality and large-scale forced relocations—often to completely unfamiliar territory.

Much has been lost of indigenous North American culture: Too many tribes and languages are extinct, and others are so depleted as to be functionally so. Economic and racial inequalities continue to adversely affect aboriginals; many sacred landscapes have been paved over, privatized, or otherwise degraded.

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The Importance Of Sleep and Aboriginal Health

The Importance Of Sleep and Aboriginal Health

Many people depend on sleep to perform their job and every day tasks with ease. Sleep is very important and a lot of people do not understand this. Sleep plays a huge role when it comes to your physical health. Feeling the way you do in the morning all depends on what happens while you are sleeping. If you are a teenager or a child, sleep is responsible for supporting growth and development. If you are not getting the proper amount of sleep, it can lead to exhaustion, lack of progress, communication, cooperation and so much more. You are going to have problems making decisions, it will affect how you react to certain things in the environment and your mental health. It is like when a baby does not sleep through the night, they are usually cranky the next day. If your toddler does not take a nap, they are most likely going to be cranky or get over tired. Sleeping well improves learning as well whether it is in school, how to do something, and it helps you pay attention. The scary part of not getting enough sleep is that it can cause depression, suicide and cause some to get involved with risk-taking behavior. Sleep not only affects mental health, but also physical health. Sleep helps to repair blood vessels and your heart. Those who constantly get inadequate sleep tend to have an increased risk of heart disease and many other illnesses.

busy entrepreneurSleeping plays a vital role in our lives. It changes our moods and helps us to function better. Millions of people suffer with a variety of sleep disorders, diagnosed and undiagnosed. Insomnia is a common sleep disorder that leads people to stay up all night without thinking about sleeping. For those who just plain have trouble falling asleep due to their surroundings, there are quite a few things that can solve that issue. Turning off technology before bed creates a good routine for sleep, especially if you’re a busy entrepreneur.. always on your phone. When you are staring at a light from your screen, your brain thinks that it is time to be awake when it is not. Turn off your technology and you are more likely to fall asleep easier. The sane goes for sugar, don’t have any before bed. Sugar keeps you awake and if you are consuming it before bed, you are going to have issues falling asleep. Unplug yourself from the world, close your eyes and drift off.

Waking up refreshed after a great night of sleeping, you are going to function so much better. Not enough sleep will lead to all kinds of complications in the near and far future. Being grouchy could get you in trouble at work, being tired all the time will affect your decision making and it could potentially hurt someone if you are too tired to drive correctly. Sleep is extremely important in everyday life. A lot of people do not understand just how important it really is. Your mental and physical health is at risk if you are not getting the proper amount of sleep that is needed to function.

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The Native Approach To Dental Health

The Native Approach To Dental Health

When you look at dental records from our ancestors there are low numbers of dental problems compared to modern teeth.

Dental problems such as tooth decay and gum disease can lead to other health problems like heart disease.

Besides brushing your teeth with homemade or store bought toothpaste or constantly rinsing your mouth with mouthwash you should eat a diet high in minerals, micronutrients, and other cofactors that have a role in protecting your teeth and bones.

Let’s take a closer look at some of these pointers, and see if we can learn a thing or two:

indigenous clan

Vitamins and Nutrients

Vitamin A, D, and K2 are a trinity of micronutrients that work together to help bone and tooth mineralization; this means that the calcium and other minerals are easily absorbed by the bones and teeth instead of arteries and creating plaque build-up.

Get outside in the sunshine or you can take a vitamin D supplement, eat grass-fed butter, hard cheeses and organ meats or you can take a vitamin K2 supplement, get your vitamin A from liver, egg yolks or other animal products.

You need to consume plenty of minerals in your diet, get them from leafy greens, grass-fed meats, organ meats, and roots. Get plenty of calcium, phosphorous, magnesium and other critical micronutrients that are very important to overall health and dental health.

Avoid All Grains

Grains, beans, and other legumes that have high content of phytic acid should be avoided because it is known to bind to and prevent the absorption of vital minerals that are needed for dental health. If you eat nuts you should limit your intake because they also contain phytic acid and high amounts of calories or you should try soaking or sprouting them.

 

Chew Sticks

Many cultures have used chewing sticks from trees that have medicinal or antimicrobial benefits, like neem, miswak, or tea tree. If you do not have access to one of these trees there are several places to find and purchase chew sticks online. A study concluded that a miswak chew stick was more effective when used correctly than using a tooth brush at reducing plaque build-up and gingivitis.

Chew sticks do not need tooth paste and are just as effective as using a tooth brush, as long as you know how to use it.

Tooth Paste

The daily use of toothpaste can increase abrasion when brushing, if you brush with only water less abrasive force is produced. Brushing your teeth is more important than the tooth paste you use; brushing without paste can be more effective at getting rid of plaque. You can make herbal toothpaste out of herbs and plants to help treat bleeding of the gums and oral hygiene.
If you get the proper vitamins and nutrients and other environmental cofactors under control you should not have to fixate on dental hygiene besides daily brushing.

Sources:

http://www.dentalguideaustralia.com

http://www.healthinfonet.ecu.edu.au

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Healing the Whole Patient: Traditional Aboriginal Health Care

Healing the Whole Patient: Traditional Aboriginal Health Care

Traditional health care as practiced by America’s indigenous peoples has a long history. For thousands of years, herbal remedies and healing rituals have been the basis of medical treatment for native peoples from Alaska to South America. However, in the 20th century, some practices were banned—until the passage of the American Indian Religious Freedom Act in 1978. Health systems serving indigenous populations now employ time-honored treatments and ceremonies in restoring their patients to health.

Traditional American aboriginal healing, unlike traditional “white man’s medicine,” does not differentiate between spiritual, mental, and physical health. In fact, the more than 500 nations that make up American indigenous peoples have a common belief: that there is a spiritual cause of almost all illnesses. In order to enjoy good health, an individual must abide by religious precepts, observe community laws, and value all life (human, animal, plant, and even entities such as rocks and rivers). Failure to do so negatively affects the mind-body-spirit balance, with illness as the result.

To restore this equilibrium, patients turn to medicine people. These individuals may receive their healing power from a vision or by being a member of a family of healers. Both men and women may fill this role, and many are shamans (holy people) as well. Their relationship with the people in need of their services goes beyond curing the illness; they instill confidence and hope and often play the role of counselor. Whatever their titles, healers treat the patient, not the disease.

For these reasons, traditional medicine is a combination of ritual and remedy. Sweat lodges are a well-known example of spiritual healing. Not only do sweat baths restore spiritual, mental, and physical harmony, sweating improves endocrine gland function, removes toxins and germs, and stimulates the heart to pump more blood. Ceremonies such as Lakota and Navajo sings, which can last from two to nine days and are led by an adept singer, are reported to cure disorders as varied as diabetes, asthma, and skin rashes.

Herbal remedies play this dual role, as well. Sage, for example, is deemed to have the power to remove bad spirits from body and soul. This attractive flowering plant is used to treat a number of ailments, including digestive disorders, kidney, lung, bone, and skin conditions, allergies, and anxiety. Cedar fruit and leaves, when boiled and drunk, are an affective cough remedy.

Indigenous peoples of the Americas are to thank for many medicines that are used worldwide to treat and cure a variety of diseases. Quinine was initially used by the Incas to remedy heart-rhythm abnormalities, cramps, and more. The drug gained recognition in Europe in the 17th century for its malaria-treating capabilities and eventually began to be employed as an effective fever reducer, pain reliever, and anti-inflammatory. And modern medical care has been revolutionized by a medicine derived from willow bark, better known as aspirin. Even more noteworthy is a traditional method of infection treatment utilizing mold. From this centuries-old remedy was born the life-saving drug known as penicillin.

With a long and successful history of treating the whole patient, traditional medicine plays a central role in restoring individuals and communities to physical, emotional, and spiritual health. It’s a tradition of which native peoples can be proud.

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